Colette

Weekend Reading: Local Fibers, Eco-Fashion + Tartan

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Photo credit to Windryder via Flickr.
Photo from Windryder via Flickr.

Do you remember hearing about flour sack dresses from someone who lived through the 30s? About making the most of materials you have? Sustainability is a big theme around here this month. Not only is it Earth Day in just a few weeks, but I’m reading more and more about fashion and sustainability every day. Hopefully the conversation only continues to grow.

Have any eco-conscious or locally sourced brands you’d like to share? Are you going to celebrate Fashion Revolution this month? Share below and we’ll help spread the word.

Weekend Reading:

For more links every week, you can follow us on Twitter, where we’re always posting interesting tidbits and discussions.

Sarai Mitnick   —   Founder

Sarai started Colette back in 2009. She believes the primary role of a business should be to help people. She loves good books, sewing with wool, her charming cats, working in her garden, and eating salsa.

Comments 3

Skye

My Maw Maw spoke a few times about the shame of having to wear flour-sack dresses when she was growing up and for a long time I thought she meant ‘flower-sack’ dresses and thought they sounded pretty great. Especially once I began thrifting and realized that flour-sacks were made up of really cute, ditzy, flowery prints. She never quite recovered from the poverty of the Great Depression, it marked her forever, which I think is such a shame, but I guess it’s an easy thing for me to say having grown up with regular comforts and reliable food sources. Love the photo by the way.

Elle threadtension.com

Oh man! I generally dislike when people flagrantly promote their own blogs in comments, but I JUST did a roundup of my favorite ethical brands on my blog: https://threadtension.wordpress.com/2016/03/30/my-ethical-fashion-favorites/

I’m definitely not a person who wants to make EVERYTHING she wears (don’t have the patience or the time!) but I am really concerned with not promoting sweat shop labor. I’m getting to a point where I have a go-to for most of my wardrobe needs (I know what things I will make myself, where to buy jeans when mine get holey, good sources for shoes, etc.). It’s a process, but it makes me feel at peace and happy!

Bonnie C Westrom

Just wanted to add that my grandmother collected little pieces of silk in tea or coffee or whatever, I’m not sure and quilted them together with a stitch sampler. I have it . It’s dainty and beautiful. I wondered if anyone else’s grandmother’s did the same thing?

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